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Australians say the Australian Government’s top priority is to ‘Maintain a Balanced Budget and no increase in Public Debt’

These findings come from a special Roy Morgan survey conducted in Australia on attitudes towards priorities for the Australian Government in the future. A cross-section of 637 men and women aged 14 or over were interviewed by telephone over the last three nights, June 10-12, 2014.

Australians say the top Government policy priority must be to ‘Maintain a Balanced Budget and no increase in Public Debt’ (27%, down 6% from October 2009). Almost as many Australians say the top policy priority must be ‘Overcoming the Skills Shortage’ (25%, up 2%) and 24% (down 1%) say the Government’s top priority should be to ‘Promote Infrastructure Development’.

Although ‘Driving Productivity Growth’ (20%, up 4%) is the only policy priority that has increased on each occasion Roy Morgan has asked this question, it remains behind the other three options as a priority for Government Policy over the next 10 years according to respondents surveyed in a special telephone Morgan Poll conducted on Government policy priorities in mid-June.

Analysis by Voting Intention

Analysis by Voting Intention shows big differences in opinion from the major parties. ‘Maintaining a Balanced Budget’ is the main priority of the L-NP (38%) compared to the ALP (14%), the Greens (9%) and PUP (20%). The main priority of the ALP (40%) and the Greens (39%) is ‘Overcoming the Skills Shortage’ compared to the L-NP (11%). Palmer United Party supporters’ number one priority is ‘Driving Productivity Growth’ (51%).

Government Priority over Next 10 Years

May
2008

Nov
2008

May
2009

Oct
2009

June
2014

%

%

%

%

%

Maintaining a Balanced Budget &
 no increase in Public Debt

30

21

29

33

27

Overcoming the Skills Shortage

28

30

19

23

25

Promoting Infrastructure Development

29

32

34

25

24

Driving Productivity Growth

8

11

15

16

20

Can’t Say

5

6

3

3

4

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

Gary Morgan says:

“Australians are fairly evenly split over what should be the Government’s main policy priority over the next 10 years with 27% (down 6% since October 2009) saying the Government’s main policy priority should be ‘Maintaining a Balanced Budget and no increase in Public Debt’ compared to 25% (up 2%) that nominate ‘Overcoming the Skills Shortage’ and 24% (down 1%) that say it should be ‘Promoting Infrastructure Development’. Interestingly, ‘Driving Productivity Growth (20%, up 4%) is the only policy priority that has increased in importance each time this question has been asked – now up 12% since May 2008.

“L-NP supporters clearly believe ‘Maintaining a Balanced Budget and no increase in Public Debt (38%) is the most important priority for the Abbot Government whereas ALP supporters (40%) and Greens supporters (39%) say the top priority needs to be ‘Overcoming the Skills Shortage’.  Palmer United Party supporters’ highest priority is ‘Driving Productivity Growth (51%).”

Respondents were asked: “Which ONE of the following should be the Number One priority for Government Policy over the next 10 years?” These findings come from a special Roy Morgan survey conducted in Australia on attitudes towards priorities for the Australian Government in the future. A cross-section of 637 men and women aged 14 or over were interviewed by telephone over the last three nights, June 10-12, 2014.

Respondents were asked: “Which ONE of the following should be the Number One priority for Government Policy over the next 10 years?”

Total all people
 aged 14+

Electors

Federal Voting Intention

 

June
2014

June
2014

L-NP

ALP

Greens

Palmer#

Ind/ Others

Can’t
say#

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Maintaining a Balanced Budget &
 no increase in Public Debt

27

25

38

14

9

20

33

25

Overcoming the Skills Shortage

25

26

11

40

39

15

31

16

Promoting Infrastructure Development

24

25

27

25

33

14

19

25

Driving Productivity Growth

20

21

22

20

9

51

12

12

Can’t Say

4

3

2

1

10

-

5

22

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

#Figures for some these demographics must be treated with caution as there are under 50 interviews.


 

Total all people aged 14+

Analysis by States & Regions

 

June
2014

Capital
Cities

Country
Areas

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas#

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Maintaining a Balanced Budget &
 no increase in Public Debt

27

26

30

23

30

29

24

36

35

Overcoming the Skills Shortage

25

23

27

29

21

20

37

20

24

Promoting Infrastructure Development

24

27

18

28

26

22

17

16

16

Driving Productivity Growth

20

19

22

17

19

24

18

24

25

Can’t Say

4

5

3

3

4

5

4

4

-

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

#Figures for some these demographics must be treated with caution as there are under 50 interviews.


 

Total all
people
 aged 14+

Analysis by Sex & Age

 

June
2014

Men

Women

14-17#

18-24

25-34

35-49

50-64

65+

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Maintaining a Balanced Budget &
 no increase in Public Debt

27

25

29

61

32

35

18

21

33

Overcoming the Skills Shortage

25

21

28

16

21

25

25

26

28

Promoting Infrastructure Development

24

29

19

11

20

27

29

25

18

Driving Productivity Growth

20

21

19

10

22

12

23

24

20

Can’t Say

4

4

5

2

5

1

5

4

1

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

#Figures for some these demographics must be treated with caution as there are under 50 interviews.


For further information:

Contact

Office

Mobile

Gary Morgan:

+61 3 9224 5213

+61 411 129 094

Michele Levine:

+61 3 9224 5215

+61 411 129 093


Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. The following table gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. The figures are approximate and for general guidance only, and assume a simple random sample. Allowance for design effects (such as stratification and weighting) should be made as appropriate.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

500

±4.5

±3.9

±2.7

±1.9

1,000

±3.2

±2.7

±1.9

±1.4