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Home brands triumph in Aussie underwear departments

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source (Australia), July 2013 – June 2014 (n=15,541).NB: does not include the 518,000 people who couldn’t say what brand of underwear they bought in the last 4 weeks

Almost one in five Australians aged 14+ buy underwear in an average four-week period. The best-selling brand is Bonds, bought by 4.9% of us (or 951,000 people). Among the other popular brands, an interesting trend emerges: despite the growing proportion of shoppers who say they ‘trust well-known brands better than the stores’ own,’ four of the five top-sellers are stores’-own rather than name brands …

Purchased by 2.7% of Aussies (526,000 people) in an average four weeks, Target is the second-most popular brand of underwear after Bonds. Kmart (2.0% or 380,000 people), Best & Less Essentials (1.3% or 260,000 people) and other Stores’ Own Brands (1.0% or 202,000 people) account for the following three top spots.

Australia’s 10 best-selling underwear brands in average 4 weeks

underwear-sales

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source (Australia), July 2013 – June 2014 (n=15,541).NB: does not include the 518,000 people who couldn’t say what brand of underwear they bought in the last 4 weeks

Is underwear exempt from brand trust?

In the year to June 2010, 45.9% of Aussies agreed with the statement ‘I trust well-known brands better than the stores’ own’. By 2014, this had risen to 48.2%. Those who agreed that ‘I have favourite brands for most things I buy and I tend to stick to them’ grew from 67.0% to 70.3%.

However, these attitudes don’t appear to extend to our underwear purchasing decisions. While people who bought Rio and Triumph undies in the last four weeks were more likely than the average Australian to agree with the statement ‘I have favourite brands for most things I buy and I tend to stick to them’, so too were people who bought Target and Allsorts (one of Big W’s home brands) underwear.

People who bought name-brands such as Berlei and Triumph were significantly more likely to agree that ‘I trust well-known brands better than the stores’ own’, while those who bought Kmart, Best & Less, and other Stores’ Own Brand underwear were far less likely to agree. People who bought Target and Allsorts undies were around average in terms of their agreement with this statement, an indication that some stores’ own brands could close the gap on name-brand underwear. 

Warren Reid, Group Account Director – Consumer Products, Roy Morgan Research, says:

“Even though a growing majority of Australians say they stick to their favourite brands when shopping, and nearly half trust well-known brands more than the stores’ own, these attitudes have not impacted on the success of stores’ own brands when it comes to underwear.

“True, brand-conscious shoppers are more likely to buy brand-name underwear, but the fact that stores’ own varieties are selling so well suggests that some of these shoppers are willing to overlook the brand (or lack thereof) when it comes to underwear. Perhaps it’s not such an issue when the garment isn’t visible? Or perhaps these home brands have become ‘brands’ in the mind of the customer.

“Recent findings from Roy Morgan Research suggest that stores’ own clothing ranges could have a bright future, and the popularity of stores’ own underwear may be an early indicator of this trend…”

For comments or more information about Roy Morgan Research’s retail data, please contact:

Warren Reid, Group Account Director – Consumer Products
Office: +61 (3) 9224 5161
Warren.Reid@roymorgan.com

Related research findings

View our extensive range of Retail Products Profiles, including Women’s Underwear (Tops & Bottoms) buyer profiles, and Men’s Underwear buyer profiles.

You might also be interested in our Department Store Customer profiles, including a Target customer profile, Kmart customer profile and a Best & Less customer profile.

These profiles provide a broad understanding of the target audience, in terms of demographics, attitudes, activities and media usage in Australia.

About Roy Morgan Research

Roy Morgan Research is the largest independent Australian research company, with offices in each state of Australia, as well as in New Zealand, the United States and the United Kingdom. A full service research organisation specialising in omnibus and syndicated data, Roy Morgan Research has over 70 years’ experience in collecting objective, independent information on consumers.

Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. Margin of error gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. Allowance for design effects (such as stratification and weighting) should be made as appropriate.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

 

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

5,000

±1.4

±1.2

±0.8

±0.6

7,500

±1.1

±1.0

±0.7

±0.5

10,000

±1.0

±0.9

±0.6

±0.4

20,000

±0.7

±0.6

±0.4

±0.3

50,000

±0.4

±0.4

±0.3

±0.2