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Magazine readership finishes 2016 on a high

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source, January to December 2016 sample n = 50,144 Australians 14+

Roy Morgan today releases the latest Australian Magazine Print Readership and Cross-Platform Audience results for the year to December 2016. Print magazines reached 12,658,000 Australians aged 14+, up 3.6 percent since 2015.  

Top Magazines – 12 months to December 2016

 

Title

Average issue Readership

1

Coles Magazine

3,729,000

2

Fresh

3,426,000

3

Better Homes and Gardens

1,841,000

4

Women's Weekly

1,618,000

5

Woman's Day

1,313,000

6

New Idea

1,145,000

7

Open Road (NSW)

1,129,000

8

National Geographic

1,098,000

9

That's Life

693,000

10

Royal Auto (Vic)

642,000

11

House & Garden

633,000

12

Taste.com.au Magazine

605,000

13

Australian Geographic

591,000

14

Road Ahead (Qld)

555,000

15

Take 5

528,000

16

Super Food Ideas

509,000

17

Reader's Digest Australia

506,000

18

Qantas Magazine

467,000

19

TV Week

463,000

20

Recipes+

407,000

20

New Scientist

407,000


Print Readership Highlights

Half of magazine categories enjoyed year-on-year growth, including Food & Entertainment (with net readership up 15.1 percent), Sports (up 15.1 percent), Business, Financial & Airline (up 8.7 percent), General Interest (up 7.7 percent) and Women's Fashion (up 5.5 percent).

Many of the 20 fastest growing titles were already among the most popular, and yet still managed to entice more readers. These include Australian Geographic (up 31.0 percent to 591,000), New Scientist (up 26.8 percent to 321,000), Taste.com.au Magazine (up 26.0 percent to 605,000), and Time (up 18.2 percent to 350,000).

The two supermarket freebies are also going from strength to strength: Coles Magazine is up 24.5 percent to 3,729,000 readers per issue, and Fresh is up 24.7 percent to 3,426,000.

Other titles that managed to build further upon wide reach include Motor (up 40.6 percent to 149,000), Harper's Bazaar (up 39.8 percent to 144,000), Big Issue (up 35.9 percent to 231,000), TV Soap (up 34.8 percent to 186,000), The Monthly (up 23.1 percent to 176,000), InStyle (up 19.8 percent to 157,000) and Unique Cars (up 19.1 percent to 212,000).

But while the rich get richer, the niche get nicher. Half of the 20 magazines that showed the largest readership declines over the period were already reaching fewer than 100,000 readers per issue in 2015.

Prevention ended its run at Pacific Magazines down 9.5 percent to 95,000 readers—which its new licensed publisher nextmedia will be hoping to lift back above six digits in 2017. The presses stopped altogether Practical Parenting and Bride To Be, which also reached fewer than 100,000 readers each by the time of their closures. However Your Garden was still reaching an average 142,000 readers per issue at the time of its demise, and was steady year-on-year. The magazine, like many others, had recouped some readers after the period of industry-wide decline to 2014; however clearly not enough to save it.

Following its final print issue in December, Dolly is now an online-only title. Across 2016, its average issue scored an average 157,000 readers (down 7.1 percent since 2015, despite the move to bi-monthly issues in the second half of the year). In the coming months our data will show how many of those page-turners become scrollers and swipers.

View the full Magazine Readership Results

Cross-Platform Audience Highlights

13 titles increased their total combined reach across print, website and app, compared with the previous results for the 12 months to September 2016. Of them, nine gained across both print and digital platforms, with across-the-board growth for a diverse range of titles:

National Geographic (up to 1,372,000, 24 percent of whom accessed it through digital channels) and Australian Geographic (806,000, with 33 percent digital), Street Machine (302,000, with 28 percent digital) and 4X4 Australia (257,000, with 45 percent digital), Elle (270,000, with 48 percent digital) and Harper’s Bazaar (214,000, with 35 percent digital), Men’s Health (540,000, with 38 percent digital), Time (657,000, with 51 percent digital) and The Monthly (318,000, with 60 percent digital – the most heavily digital audience of all magazines measured).

The top three most widely read magazines across print and digital are the same as the top three paid-for titles in print only. Better Homes & Gardens reached a digital audience of 391,000 readers in an average four weeks last year. Almost 70 percent of these were digital only, who didn’t also read the print magazine. This increased its total reach to 2,112,000.

The Australian Women’s Weekly remains in second spot, but closed the gap. Over 80 percent of its 426,000 digital audience were extra readers not reached in print, driving its total cross-platform audience up 1,965,000.

Weekly title Woman’s Day reached 1,402,000 readers cross-platform in an average 7-days, including 131,000 digital readers (89,000 of whom were unique to digital). 

View the full Magazine Cross-Platform Readership Results

Michele Levine, CEO, Roy Morgan Research, says:

“Last year heralded an exodus of magazine publishers from the Audited Media Association of Australia (AMAA) circulation audit. Many in the industry questioned the move, as well as why more media agencies and advertisers didn’t pressure publishers to continue.

“While the audit did provide a ‘sense-check’ with regard to readers per copy, it’s more important that advertisers can verify the real reach of their ads.

“Now more ever, Roy Morgan’s “one source” of independent truth is relied upon by advertisers, agencies and publishers alike as the go-to source for media planning and audience data.”

For comments or more information please contact:
Roy Morgan - Enquiries
Office: +61 (03) 9224 5309
askroymorgan@roymorgan.com


About Roy Morgan

Roy Morgan is the largest independent Australian research company, with offices throughout Australia, as well as in Indonesia, the United States and the United Kingdom. A full service research organisation specialising in omnibus and syndicated data, Roy Morgan has over 70 years’ experience in collecting objective, independent information on consumers.

Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. Margin of error gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. Allowance for design effects (such as stratification and weighting) should be made as appropriate.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

1,000

±3.0

±2.7

±1.9

±1.3

5,000

±1.4

±1.2

±0.8

±0.6

7,500

±1.1

±1.0

±0.7

±0.5

10,000

±1.0

±0.9

±0.6

±0.4

20,000

±0.7

±0.6

±0.4

±0.3

50,000

±0.4

±0.4

±0.3

±0.2