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Turnbull hits the mark on Q&A

Approximately 150 Australians, including Labor, Coalition, Green and Other voters, younger and older voters, and men and women, responded as they watched and listened to the arguments put forward by both men.

Roy Morgan Reactor

Last night the Roy Morgan Reactor tested Australians’ responses to the Deputy ALP Leader Anthony Albanese and Shadow Minister for Communications Malcolm Turnbull’s appearance on ABC’s Q&A on Monday night.

Approximately 150 Australians, including Labor, Coalition, Green and Other voters, younger and older voters, and men and women, responded as they watched and listened to the arguments put forward by both men.

The Reactor window shows how women (the red line) and men (blue line) responded.  To view responses of ALP, LNP & Greens voters, or Older vs. Younger viewers click on the Graph Panel to view the full Interactive Reactor Video Report.

Second-by-second Reactor responses indicate that Malcolm Turnbull was more successful than Anthony Albanese in engaging viewers.  The Reactor curve remained near the neutral 50 line for most of Mr Albanese’s comments, whereas it climbed well into positive territory for Mr Turnbull much of the time. The Reactor reveals that Malcolm Turnbull successfully used a mix of passion – such as when explaining a past Liberal leadership change was about policy, not personality – and humour, such as his self-deprecating reference to his own loss of leadership or his suggestion that Mr Rudd could debate himself.  In contrast, Anthony Albanese’s attempt at humour, when referring to the irony of receiving a lecture about party unity from Malcolm, failed to resonate with the audience.

Although responses largely followed party lines for the two main parties, it is interesting that Mr Albanese failed to generate the degree of positive reaction among Labor voters that Mr Turnbull generated among Coalition voters.

Roy Morgan Research CEO, Michele Levine says: 

“It was a very comfortable Malcolm Turnbull we saw on Q&A on Monday night and the audience seemed comfortable with him as well.  In contrast, Anthony Albanese failed to inspire, even among his own party’s supporters.”

In terms of gender, males judged Mr Albanese more harshly than did females.  Younger audience members were generally less engaged with the topics discussed by both men, perhaps reflecting a lack of interest in internal party machinations rather than policy.  Indeed, at the end of our selected highlights, when Corinne Grant suggested a lack of policy discussion from Tony Abbott, the Reactor curve for younger respondents jumps instantly.

The highlight for our audience was when Corinne Grant suggested to Mr Turnbull that his party members would prefer him rather than Tony Abbott as party leader – the Reactor curve soars, perhaps in response to Corinne’s forthright statement, but perhaps also to Malcolm’s wry smile!

Click here to watch the video of elements of the Debate and the continuous responses of Labor and Coalition voters.


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For further information:

Michele Levine:    Office +61 3 9224 5215   Mobile +61 411 129 093


Roy Morgan Reactor